Inferential statistical procedures and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (aids)

            In the research article entitled “Building protective factors to offset sexually risky behaviors among black youths: A randomized control trial” authored by Bell and colleagues (2008), the effectiveness of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention program was tested.  The specific HIV program, known as Collaborative HIV Adolescent Mental Health

Program South Africa (CHAMPSA), is an adaptation of the Collaborative HIV Adolescent Mental Health Program (CHAMP) HIV program of the United States, which focuses on the use of family relationships in protecting adolescents in carrying out risky actions that are strongly associated with HIV infection (McKay et al., 2004).

            The null hypothesis of the research program stated that the CHAMPSA program is an effective HIV prevention scheme in South Africa.  The alternative hypothesis of the research program is that the CHAMPSA program is not an effective HIV prevention scheme.  The sampling procedure of the research involved 557 children, ranging from the age of 9 to 13 years old and living in the town on KwaDedangendlale, which is situated on the east coast of South Africa.  Approximately 59% of the 557 children were females.  The independent variables were composed of the living conditions of the children, as well as educational background.  The dependent variables were composed of the presence of a caregiver for each child participant.  The alpha level employed in the statistical analysis of the data gathered was p < 0.05.  The research results significantly show that the CHAMPSA HIV prevention program was an effective scheme in teaching adolescents from performing risky behaviors that are strongly linked to HIV infection.  The research described may be limited in scope because the use of monetary rewards may have been a strong factor for the children to participate in the HIV prevention program and not their sincere and personal concern for HIV prevention.  Another issue of concern is that why did the researchers choose children that are interacting with caregivers, hence this association may pose as another dependent variable.  In addition, the study period is too short to generate any reliable information about prevention programs because the researchers only used 12 weeks to complete their research.

References

Bell CC, Bhana A, Petersen I, McKay MM, Gibbons R, Bannon W Amatya A (2008):  Building protective factors to offset sexually risky behaviors among black youths:  A randomized control trial.  J. Natl. Med. Assoc. 100(8):936–944.

McKay MM, Chasse KT and Paikoff R (2004):  Family-level impact of the CHAMP family program: A community collaborative effort to support urban families and reduce youth HIV risk exposure.  Fam. Process 43(1):79–93.

 

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